Taxation

To deduct business losses, you may have to prove “material participation” 07-20-2016

You can only deduct losses from an S corporation, partnership or LLC if you “materially participate” in the business. If you don’t, your losses are generally “passive” and can only be used to offset income from other passive activities. Any excess passive loss is suspended and must be carried forward to future years.

Material participation is determined based on the time you spend in a business activity. For most business owners, the issue rarely arises — you probably spend more than 40 hours working on your enterprise. However, there are situations when the IRS questions participation.

Several tests

To materially participate, you must spend time on an activity on a regular, continuous and substantial basis.

You must also generally meet one of the tests for material participation. For example, a taxpayer must:

  1. Work 500 hours or more during the year in the activity,
  2. Participate in the activity for more than 100 hours during the year, with no one else working more than the taxpayer, or
  3. Materially participate in the activity for any five taxable years during the 10 tax years immediately preceding the taxable year. This can apply to a business owner in the early years of retirement.

There are other situations in which you can qualify for material participation. For example, you can qualify if the business is a personal service activity (such as medicine or law). There are also situations, such as rental businesses, where it is more difficult to claim material participation. In those trades or businesses, you must work more hours and meet additional tests.

Proving your involvement

In some cases, a taxpayer does materially participate, but can’t prove it to the IRS. That’s where good recordkeeping comes in. A good, contemporaneous diary or log can forestall an IRS challenge. Log visits to customers or vendors and trips to sites and banks, as well as time spent doing Internet research. Indicate the time spent. If you’re audited, it will generally occur several years from now. Without good records, you’ll have trouble remembering everything you did.

Passive activity losses are a complicated area of the tax code. Consult with your tax adviser for more information on your situation.  For more information contact us rsibley@abcpa.com, bbailey@abcpa.com, dchandler@abcpa.com, or cmozingo@abcpa.com.

© 2016

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FAQs about Social Security Retirement Benefits 07-18-2016

Applying for Social Security retirement benefits is a rite of passage. But many seniors are uncertain about their options, including when to start collecting benefits, how to apply, who qualifies for survivors benefits and whether benefits will be subject to income tax. Here are the answers to some common questions, along with insight into the long-term viability of the Social Security system. Continue reading


There’s still time for homeowners to save with green tax credits 07-13-2016

The income tax credit for certain energy-efficient home improvements and equipment purchases was extended through 2016 by the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015 (the PATH Act). So, you still have time to save both energy and taxes by making these eco-friendly investments.

What qualifies

The credit is for expenses related to your principal residence. It equals 10% of certain qualified improvement expenses plus 100% of certain other qualified equipment expenses, subject to a maximum overall credit of $500, which is reduced by any credits claimed in earlier years. (Because of this reduction, many people who previously claimed the credit will be ineligible for any further credits in 2016.)

Examples of improvement investments potentially eligible for the 10% of expense credit include:

  • Insulation systems that reduce heat loss or gain,
  • Metal and asphalt roofs with heat-reduction components that meet Energy Star requirements, and
  • Exterior windows (including skylights) and doors that meet Energy Star requirements. These expenditures are subject to a separate $200 credit cap.

Examples of equipment investments potentially eligible for the 100% of expense credit include:

  • Qualified central air conditioners; electric heat pumps; electric heat pump water heaters; water heaters that run on natural gas, propane, or oil; and biomass fuel stoves used for heating or hot water, which are subject to a separate $300 credit cap.
  • Qualified furnaces and hot water boilers that run on natural gas, propane or oil, which are subject to a separate $150 credit cap.
  • Qualified main air circulating fans used in natural gas, propane and oil furnaces, which are subject to a separate $50 credit cap.

Manufacturer certifications required

When claiming the credit, you must keep with your tax records a certification from the manufacturer that the product qualifies. The certification may be found on the product packaging or the manufacturer’s website. Additional rules and limits apply. For more information about these and other green tax breaks for individuals, contact us – rsibley@abcpa.com, bbailey@abcpa.com, dchandler@abcpa.com, or cmozingo@abcpa.com.

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3 mutual fund tax hazards to watch out for 07-11-2016

Investing in mutual funds is an easy way to diversify a portfolio, which is one reason why they’re commonly found in retirement plans such as IRAs and 401(k)s. But if you hold such funds in taxable accounts, or are considering such investments, beware of these three tax hazards:

  1. High turnover rates. Mutual funds with high turnover rates can create income that’s taxed at ordinary-income rates. Choosing funds that provide primarily long-term gains can save you more tax dollars because of the lower long-term rates.
  2. Earnings reinvestments. Earnings on mutual funds are typically reinvested, and unless you keep track of these additions and increase your basis accordingly, you may report more gain than required when you sell the fund. (Since 2012, brokerage firms have been required to track — and report to the IRS — your cost basis in mutual funds acquired during the tax year.)
  3. Capital gains distributions. Buying equity mutual fund shares late in the year can be costly tax-wise. Such funds often declare a large capital gains distribution at year end, which is a taxable event. If you own the shares on the distribution’s record date, you’ll be taxed on the full distribution amount even if it includes significant gains realized by the fund before you owned the shares. And you’ll pay tax on those gains in the current year — even if you reinvest the distribution.

If your mutual fund investments aren’t limited to your tax-advantaged retirement accounts, watch out for these hazards. And contact us — we can help you safely navigate them to keep your tax liability to a minimum.  For more information please contact us,  rsibley@abcpa.com, bbailey@abcpa.com, dchandler@abcpa.com, or cmozingo@abcpa.com.

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SSARS + SaaS Combine to Make Cloud Accounting Possible and Affordable 07-08-2016

This is an exciting time, which is not a phrase usually associated with accounting. Technology is advancing at an amazing pace. Even though your first thought may not be how technology advancements apply to the preparation of your business financials, rest assured it does.

In the past, having a CPA prepare monthly financial statements for a business was cost-prohibitive for many businesses. The reason being, the CPA had to provide a report based on attestation procedures along with the prepared financial statements. This anticipated that someone outside of management might use the financial statements. That obviously adds time, which in turn adds costs.

That, however, has changed.

Thanks in large part to the two acronyms below, accounting services performed by CPAs, specifically the preparation of financial statements, are more accessible to the average business than ever before.

SSARS 21
The first factor leading to a change was “Statement on Standards for Accounting and Review Services (SSARS) number 21.” SSARS is the professional standard CPAs use in preparing financial statements. WIth the issuance of SSARS 21 in 2014 (Section 70 specifically), the report generation and attestation procedures requirements mentioned above were removed in most cases.

As a result, you get only the information that is of value to you, and it is delivered in a timely, cost-efficient manner by your CPA.

SaaS
The second major factor in making CPA-prepared financials a feasible option for more businesses is the proliferation of Software as a Service (SaaS). Per Wikipedia, SaaS is “…a software licensing and delivery model in which software is licensed on a subscription basis and is centrally hosted.” It’s what people commonly refer to as cloud computing.

The reason SaaS is having such a major impact on accounting is two-fold:

  1. Individual clients can both submit and access information without having to download software. All that is required are login credentials.
  2. Banks and other financial institutions also offer online access to accounts, making it easy for accountants to integrate live data with the general ledgers used for financial  statement preparation.

By having so much readily-available information, CPAs can provide management with virtually real-time access to accurate financial statements. This also enhances internal controls, affording management the peace of mind to concentrate on running the business.

If you aren’t already taking advantage of these advancements, maybe it’s time you did. If you’re tired of administrative functions occupying your time, or you’re still preparing financial statements internally because you think you can’t afford a CPA on staff, there is a better way. And it is more accessible to businesses than ever before.

 

OneSource from Aldridge, Borden & Company is a comprehensive, cloud-based suite of accounting services that can be tailored to each client’s needs, including preparation of business financials. Contact Billy Cox today for more information.

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Throw a company picnic for employees this summer and enjoy larger deductions 06-22-2016

Many businesses host a picnic for employees in the summer. It’s a fun activity for your staff and you may be able to take a larger deduction for the cost than you would on other meal and entertainment expenses.

Deduction limits

Generally, businesses are limited to deducting 50% of allowable meal and entertainment expenses. But certain expenses are 100% deductible, including expenses:

  • For recreational or social activities for employees, such as summer picnics and holiday parties,
  • For food and beverages furnished at the workplace primarily for employees, and
  • That are excludable from employees’ income as de minimis fringe benefits.

There is one caveat for a 100% deduction: The entire staff must be invited. Otherwise, expenses are deductible under the regular business entertainment rules.

Recordkeeping requirements

Whether you deduct 50% or 100% of allowable expenses, there are a number of requirements, including certain records you must keep to prove your expenses.

If your company has substantial meal and entertainment expenses, you can reduce your tax bill by separately accounting for and documenting expenses that are 100% deductible. If doing so would create an administrative burden, you may be able to use statistical sampling methods to estimate the portion of meal and entertainment expenses that are fully deductible.

For more information about deducting business meals and entertainment, including how to take advantage of the 100% deduction, please contact us rsibley@abcpa.com, bbailey@abcpa.com, dchandler@abcpa.com, or cmozingo@abcpa.com.

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An Introduction To IC-DISCs 06-20-2016

In today’s global economy, sales from the United States (“US”) to foreign countries are more common than ever before. What may not be as commonly known are certain tax advantages that might allow US entities to reduce and defer paying taxes on its foreign sales.

US entities that sale into foreign markets can utilize something known as an interest-charge domestic international sales corporation (“IC-DISC”). Basically, it is a separate, incorporated entity established by a US company for the purpose of receiving commissions. The commissions paid into the IC-DISC are not subject to Federal Income Tax, but rather when distributions are made to the IC-DISC owners, the owners pay taxes at the current dividend rate.

The following chart illustrates the difference in cash flow to the owners as a result of the tax advantages that may be available through an IC-DISC.

How-an-IC-DISC-can-reduce-Taxes

Generally, the commission has to be paid to the IC-DISC within 60 days of the close of the taxable year. Since commissions paid to an IC-DISC are not taxable until they are distributed to the owners, considering certain limitations, the IC-DISC may retain the commissions and thereby defer payment of taxes. After a year, however, the owners are subject to interest payments on the commissions retained in the IC-DISC.

In summary, an IC-DISC can be an extremely effective means of reducing federal taxes for a US company doing business internationally. As is the case with anything tax-related, however, it requires crossing all t’s and dotting all i’s. Because of that, it is imperative to seek out tax professionals with experience in these types of transactions to determine eligibility and ensure compliance.

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More Adult Children Opting to Live with Parents 06-20-2016

Plans to remodel your kid's bedroom into an exercise room or walk-in closet after he or she completes school may have to be put on hold. A recent study reveals that more young adults are opting to live with their parents as opposed to moving out on their own or with friends. Surprisingly, the uncertain economy isn't always the reason and many parents and live-in adult children are happy with the set-up. Here's more on this emerging trend. Continue reading


Finding the right tax-advantaged account to fund your health care expenses 06-15-2016

With health care costs continuing to climb, tax-friendly ways to pay for these expenses are more attractive than ever. Health Savings Accounts (HSAs), Flexible Spending Accounts (FSAs) and Health Reimbursement Accounts (HRAs) all provide opportunities for tax-advantaged funding of health care expenses. But what’s the difference between these three accounts? Here’s an overview:

HSA. If you’re covered by a qualified high-deductible health plan (HDHP), you can contribute pretax income to an employer-sponsored HSA — or make deductible contributions to an HSA you set up yourself — up to $3,350 for self-only coverage and $6,750 for family coverage for 2016. Plus, if you’re age 55 or older, you may contribute an additional $1,000.

You own the account, which can bear interest or be invested, growing tax-deferred similar to an IRA. Withdrawals for qualified medical expenses are tax-free, and you can carry over a balance from year to year.

FSA. Regardless of whether you have an HDHP, you can redirect pretax income to an employer-sponsored FSA up to an employer-determined limit — not to exceed $2,550 in 2016. The plan pays or reimburses you for qualified medical expenses.

What you don’t use by the plan year’s end, you generally lose — though your plan might allow you to roll over up to $500 to the next year. Or it might give you a 2 1/2-month grace period to incur expenses to use up the previous year’s contribution. If you have an HSA, your FSA is limited to funding certain “permitted” expenses.

HRA. An HRA is an employer-sponsored account that reimburses you for medical expenses. Unlike an HSA, no HDHP is required. Unlike an FSA, any unused portion typically can be carried forward to the next year. And there’s no government-set limit on HRA contributions. But only your employer can contribute to an HRA; employees aren’t allowed to contribute.

Questions? We’d be happy to answer them — or discuss other ways to save taxes in relation to your health care expenses.  For more information contact us rsibley@abcpa.com, bbailey@abcpa.com, dchandler@abcpa.com, or cmozingo@abcpa.com.

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Stock market volatility can cut tax on a Roth IRA conversion 06-01-2016

This year’s stock market volatility can be unnerving, but if you have a traditional IRA, this volatility may provide a valuable opportunity: It can allow you to convert your traditional IRA to a Roth IRA at a lower tax cost.

Traditional IRAs

Contributions to a traditional IRA may be deductible, depending on your modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) and whether you participate in a qualified retirement plan, such as a 401(k). Funds in the account can grow tax-deferred.

On the downside, you generally must pay income tax on withdrawals, and, with only a few exceptions, you’ll face a penalty if you withdraw funds before age 59½ — and an even larger penalty if you don’t take your required minimum distributions (RMDs) after age 70½.

Roth IRAs

Roth IRA contributions, on the other hand, are never deductible. But withdrawals — including earnings — are tax-free as long as you’re age 59½ or older and the account has been open at least five years. In addition, you’re allowed to withdraw contributions at any time tax- and penalty-free.

There are also estate planning advantages to a Roth IRA. No RMD rules apply, so you can leave funds growing tax-free for as long as you wish. Then distributions to whoever inherits your Roth IRA will be income-tax-free as well.

The ability to contribute to a Roth IRA, however, is subject to limits based on your MAGI. Fortunately, anyone is eligible to convert a traditional IRA to a Roth. The catch? You’ll have to pay income tax on the amount you convert.

Saving tax

This is where the “benefit” of stock market volatility comes in. If your traditional IRA has lost value, converting to a Roth now rather than later will minimize your tax hit. Plus, you’ll avoid tax on future appreciation when the market stabilizes.

Of course, there are more ins and outs of IRAs that need to be considered before executing a Roth IRA conversion. If your interest is piqued, discuss with us whether a conversion is right for you. For more information contact us rsibley@abcpa.com, bbailey@abcpa.com, dchandler@abcpa.com, or cmozingo@abcpa.com.

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