An Introduction To IC-DISCs

In today’s global economy, sales from the United States (“US”) to foreign countries are more common than ever before. What may not be as commonly known are certain tax advantages that might allow US entities to reduce and defer paying taxes on its foreign sales.

US entities that sale into foreign markets can utilize something known as an interest-charge domestic international sales corporation (“IC-DISC”). Basically, it is a separate, incorporated entity established by a US company for the purpose of receiving commissions. The commissions paid into the IC-DISC are not subject to Federal Income Tax, but rather when distributions are made to the IC-DISC owners, the owners pay taxes at the current dividend rate.

The following chart illustrates the difference in cash flow to the owners as a result of the tax advantages that may be available through an IC-DISC.

How-an-IC-DISC-can-reduce-Taxes

Generally, the commission has to be paid to the IC-DISC within 60 days of the close of the taxable year. Since commissions paid to an IC-DISC are not taxable until they are distributed to the owners, considering certain limitations, the IC-DISC may retain the commissions and thereby defer payment of taxes. After a year, however, the owners are subject to interest payments on the commissions retained in the IC-DISC.

In summary, an IC-DISC can be an extremely effective means of reducing federal taxes for a US company doing business internationally. As is the case with anything tax-related, however, it requires crossing all t’s and dotting all i’s. Because of that, it is imperative to seek out tax professionals with experience in these types of transactions to determine eligibility and ensure compliance.